GDPR consent design: how granular must adtech opt-ins be?

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR Leave a Comment

This note examines the range of distinct adtech data processing purposes that will require opt-in under the GDPR.[1] In late 2017 the Article 29 Working Party cautioned that “data subjects should be free to choose which purpose they accept, rather than having to consent to a bundle of processing purposes”.[2] Consent requests for multiple purposes should “allow users to give specific consent for specific purposes”.[3]  Rather than conflate several purposes for processing, Europe’s regulators caution that “the solution to comply with the conditions for valid consent lies in granularity, i.e. the separation of these purposes and obtaining consent for each purpose”.[4] This draws upon GDPR, Recital 32.[5] In short, consent requests must be granular, showing opt-ins for each distinct purpose. How granular must consent opt-ins be?

The regulatory firewall for online media and adtech

The PageFair Team GDPR Leave a Comment

This note announces Perimeter, a regulatory firewall to enable online advertising under the GDPR. It fixes data leakage from adtech and allows publishers to monetize RTB and direct ads, while respecting people’s data.  PageFair takes a strict interpretation of the GDPR. To comply, all media owners need to protect their visitors’ personal data, or else find themselves liable for significant fines and court actions. In European Law, personal data includes not only personally identifiable information (PII), but also visitor IP addresses, unique IDs, and browsing history.[1] The problem is that today’s online ads operate by actively disseminating this kind of personal data to countless 3rd parties via header bidding, RTB bid requests, tracking pixels, cookie syncs, mobile SDKs, and javascript in ad creatives.…

Can websites use “tracking walls” to force consent under GDPR?

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR 12 Comments

This note examines whether websites can use “tracking walls” under the GDPR, and challenges the recent guidance on this issue from IAB Europe.  This week, IAB Europe published a paper that advises website owners that tracking walls (i.e., modal dialogs that require people to give consent to be tracked in order to access a website) will be permissible under the GDPR. Our view is different. Several months ago we provided feedback to the IAB of what we regarded as serious mistakes in a preliminary draft of this paper, which we believe will be very detrimental to publishers who follow the paper’s advice. As it appears that our feedback did not make it into the published version of the paper, we want to put our opinion on the record, so that publishers can take it in to account when deciding what course to follow under the GDPR.…

Research result: what percentage will consent to tracking for advertising?

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR Leave a Comment

This note presents the results of a survey of 300+ publishers, adtech, brands, and various others, on whether users will consent to tracking under the GDPR and the ePrivacy Regulation.  In early August we published a note on consent, and asked whether people would click “yes”. We would like to thank the 300+ colleagues who responded to our research request. Now we present the results. UPDATE: 9 January 2018, SEE  MOST RECENT PAGEFAIR INSIDER NOTE ON GDPR CONSENT DIALOGUES from 8 January 2018.   Tracking for a single brand, on a single site. 305 respondents were asked by a publisher to permit a named brand and its analytics partners to track them on the site. A previous note explains the design of this notice.…

How the GDPR will disrupt Google and Facebook

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR 22 Comments

Google and Facebook will be disrupted by the new European data protection rules that are due to apply in May 2018. This note explains how.  Google and Facebook will be unable to use the personal data they hold for advertising purposes without user permission. This is an acute challenge because, contrary to what some commentators have assumed, they cannot use a “service-wide” opt-in for everything. Nor can they deny access to their services to users who refuse to opt-in to tracking.[1] Some parts of their businesses are likely to be disrupted more than others. The GDPR Scale When one uses Google or Facebook.com one willingly discloses personal data. These businesses have the right to process these data to provide their services when one asks them to. …

Here is what GDPR consent dialogues could look like. Will people click yes?

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR 4 Comments

THIS NOTE HAS NOW BEEN SUPERSEDED BY A A MORE RECENT PAGEFAIR INSIDER NOTE ON GDPR CONSENT DIALOGUES. PLEASE REFER TO THE NEW NOTE.  This note presents sketches of GDPR consent dialogues, and invites readers to participate in research on whether people will consent.  NoteIt is important to note that the dialogue presented in this note is only a limited consent notice. It asks to track behaviour on one site only, and for one brand only, in addition to “analytics partners”. This notice would not satisfy regulators if it were used to cover the vast chain of controllers and processors involved in conventional behavioural targeting. Consent requests In less than a year the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) will force businesses to ask Internet users for consent before they can use their personal data.…

Why the GDPR ‘legitimate interest’ provision will not save you

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR Leave a Comment

The “legitimate interest” provision in the GDPR will not save behavioral advertising and data brokers from the challenge of obtaining consent for personally identifiable data. As previous PageFair analysis illustrates, personally identifiable data (PII) will become toxic except where it has been obtained and used with consent once the General Data Protection Regulation is applied in May 2018. Even so, many advertising intermediaries believe that they can continue to use PII data without consent because of an apparent carve-out related to “legitimate interest” contained in the GDPR. This is a false hope.

Europe’s new privacy regime will disrupt the adtech Lumascape

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR Leave a Comment

In a year and a half, new European rules on the use of personal information will disrupt advertising and media across the globe. Here are the three biggest impacts.  Since 1996 when cookies were first repurposed to track users around the Web there has been an assumption that gathering and trading users' personal information is the essence of advertising online. This is about to change.