Google adopts non-personal ad targeting for the GDPR

The PageFair Team GDPR

This note examines Google’s recent announcement on the GDPR. Google has sensibly adopted non-personal ad targeting. This is very significant step forward and signals a change in the online advertising market. But Google has also taken a new and problematic approach to consent for personal data use in advertising that publishers will find hard to accept.  Google decides to use non-personal ad targeting to comply with the GDPR  Last Thursday Google sent a policy update to business partners across the Internet announcing that it would launch an advertising service based on non-personal data in order to comply with the GDPR.[1] PageFair has advocated a non-personal approach to advertising for some time, and commends Google for taking this position. As we noted six months ago,[2] Google AdWords, for example, can operate without consent if it discards personalized targeting features (and unique IDs).…

How the GDPR will disrupt Google and Facebook

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR

Google and Facebook will be disrupted by the new European data protection rules that are due to apply in May 2018. This note explains how.  Google and Facebook will be unable to use the personal data they hold for advertising purposes without user permission. This is an acute challenge because, contrary to what some commentators have assumed, they cannot use a “service-wide” opt-in for everything. Nor can they deny access to their services to users who refuse to opt-in to tracking.[1] Some parts of their businesses are likely to be disrupted more than others. The GDPR Scale When one uses Google or Facebook.com one willingly discloses personal data. These businesses have the right to process these data to provide their services when one asks them to. …

YouTube Shoots Google In Foot

The PageFair Team Adblocking, Uncategorized

YouTube pre-roll ads are driving users to install adblocking software, which in turn is having devastating effects on independent publishers. Google, who last year earned 97% of their revenue from online advertising (over $32 billion) has a product that drives people to block ads. Crazy, right? While Google may be able to reduce the impact of adblocking, many smaller publishers shut down or set up premium subscriptions to make up for lost ad revenue. But according to AdBlock users, traditional advertising is not the problem- it’s intrusive advertising that they can’t stand. More-so, they’re fed up with pre-roll YouTube ads, especially when the video they’re trying to watch isn’t much longer than the ad itself. In a recent lively discussion on Reddit, these pre-roll ads were cited as the most frequent motivation for installing adblock.…