Risks in IAB Europe’s proposed consent mechanism

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR

This note examines the recently published IAB “transparency and consent” proposal. Major flaws render the system unworkable. The real issue is what should be done with the vast majority of the audience who will not give consent.  Publishers would have no control (and are expected to blindly trust 2,000+ adtech companies) The adtech companies[1] who drafted the IAB Europe proposal claim that “publishers have full control over who they partner with, who they disclose to their users and who they obtain consent for.”[2] But the IAB Europe documentation shows that adtech companies would remain entirely free to trade the personal data with their business partners if they wish. The proposed system would share a unique[3] consent record “throughout the online advertising ecosystem”, every time an ad is loaded on a website:[4] “the OpenRTB request [from a website to an ad exchange] will contain the entire DaisyBit [a persistent cookie],[5] allowing a vendor to see which other vendors are an approved vendor or a publisher and whether they have obtained consent (and for which purposes) and which have not.”[6] There would be no control over what happens to personal data once they enter the RTB system: “[adtech] vendors may choose not to pass bid requests containing personal data to other vendors who do not have consent”.[7] This is a critical problem, because the overriding commercial incentive for many of the companies involved is to share as many data with as many partners as possible, and to share it with parent companies that run data brokerages.…

How the GDPR will disrupt Google and Facebook

Dr Johnny Ryan GDPR

Google and Facebook will be disrupted by the new European data protection rules that are due to apply in May 2018. This note explains how.  Google and Facebook will be unable to use the personal data they hold for advertising purposes without user permission. This is an acute challenge because, contrary to what some commentators have assumed, they cannot use a “service-wide” opt-in for everything. Nor can they deny access to their services to users who refuse to opt-in to tracking.[1] Some parts of their businesses are likely to be disrupted more than others. The GDPR Scale When one uses Google or Facebook.com one willingly discloses personal data. These businesses have the right to process these data to provide their services when one asks them to. …